Five types of fans

Five hearts

This post is inspired by all my fans. I’ve learnt a lot from blogging/translating and today I would like to share some of my discoveries and wisdom with you all. 😉

5 types of fans

  1. The silent lurkers

These are the type of fans that never make a single comment, click a single like, or say anything in general. Basically, you don’t even know they exist. They’re just silently supporting you.

  1. The hardcore supporters

These are the type of fans that are extremely passionate about your work. They are relentless, intense, and extremely vocal. They’re the type that will tell everyone about your creation and constantly write encouraging comments to motivate you.

Without hardcore supporters, it is almost impossible for creators to continue.

  1. The generous givers

These are the type of fans that see enough value in your work and are willing to donate or support you on patreon. These fans are extremely rare but are absolutely essential if you want to make a living out of your creation.

Note: Do not underestimate #1 and #2 as they can also be #3.  Continue reading “Five types of fans”

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Thinking ahead

long or short term planning or thinking

This post is based on my own views and experiences. My mind has grown a lot in the past year or so.

Some of you may or may not know that I translate a Chinese novel into English. Due to my translations, I have managed to gain over 600k views on my blog. Compared to huge sites with millions of readers, 600k is actually a very small amount. However, I’m very proud of what I have built on my own. From translating, I’ve learnt that:

1. People are giving me views because I am giving them something they want

This is a crucial point. The only reason why 95% of my readers come to my site is because they want to read the novel but they cannot read Chinese. Therefore, they have to come to me in order to read the English version.

So, if I want to gain more views or make more ad revenue, I need to give the people what they want.

2. Translating is short term pain but long term gain

Honestly, translating a novel takes hundreds and hundreds of hours. It is extremely difficult, tedious, and requires tremendous amounts of concentration. In fact, it is so hard that most people quit after a couple of chapters. Continue reading “Thinking ahead”